The Daily Eudemon
"The only end of writing is to enable the readers better to enjoy life."
Samuel Johnson, The Idler, 4/5/1760




  • Home
  • Advertisers
  • Favorite Quotes
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • My Professional Blawg
  • TDE Lens

  • archives
  • July 2014
  • June 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • March 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • September 2009
  • August 2009
  • July 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • April 2009
  • March 2009
  • February 2009
  • January 2009
  • December 2008
  • November 2008
  • October 2008
  • September 2008
  • August 2008
  • July 2008
  • June 2008
  • May 2008
  • April 2008
  • March 2008
  • February 2008
  • January 2008
  • December 2007
  • November 2007
  • October 2007
  • September 2007
  • August 2007
  • July 2007
  • June 2007
  • May 2007
  • April 2007
  • March 2007
  • February 2007
  • January 2007
  • December 2006
  • November 2006
  • October 2006
  • September 2006
  • August 2006
  • July 2006
  • June 2006
  • May 2006
  • April 2006
  • March 2006
  • February 2006
  • January 2006
  • December 2005
  • November 2005
  • October 2005
  • September 2005
  • August 2005
  • July 2005
  • June 2005
  • May 2005
  • April 2005
  • March 2005
  • February 2005
  • January 2005
  • December 2004
  • November 2004
  • August 2004
  • July 2004
  • June 2004
  • May 2004
  • April 2004
  • March 2004
  • February 2004
  • January 2004


  • syndicate this site
    RSS Feed
    RSS 2 Feed
    Atom Feed
    My Yahoo!
    Comments RSS

    Send Eric Scheske an E-Mail


    Tuesday
    July 22, 2014
    Kontent from the Kindle I was pleased to see an Oscar Wilde crack the Top 25 of most-highlighted passages on Kindle. Here's the passage: "I choose my friends for their good looks, my acquaintances for their good characters, and my enemies for their good intellects." The Picture of Dorian Gray. I realize it's not exactly an edifying passage, and it was written well before Wilde's deathbed conversion to Catholicism, but when you consider that 19 of the remaining Top 25 highlighted passage come from The Hunger Games series, it was good to see Wilde sneak into the Number 25 slot. * * * * * * * Number Two, incidentally, comes from Jane Austen. You can probably guess what it is: "It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife." But I attribute the popularity of that passage to Keira Knightley more than a love for the classics. * * * * * * * Opening line from a spoof of the Austen classic: "It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains." Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

    Send this post to a friend

    Monday
    July 21, 2014
    From the Notebooks “Our lives as philosophers cannot be radically divorced from what we do when we are not doing philosophy.” Gerard Casey. Indeed, I have heard the same thing said about theologians: theologians must be saints. Nassim Taleb makes a similar point in Antifragile when he writes, “Never listen to a leftist who does not give away his fortune or does not live the exact lifestyle he wants others to follow. . . . It is not too different from the womanizing popes, such as John XII, or the Borgias.” “Saints,” Taleb points out in the same passage, “have soul in their game.” Amen to that. Quite frankly, if you don’t have your own house in order, you have no business suggesting, much less requiring, people to put their own house in order or how to go about doing it. If our voting electorate applied such premises to their elected representatives, our country would leap forward in virtue. It’s fitting that the NFL be filled with reprobates and criminals. It is, after all, a game of violence. But for our statesmen to be rogues, such as the rogues that fill the Congress? Truly disturbing. Unless, of course, government action is violence, in which case it’d made sense that rogues run the government, just as rogues run the football field. And there, I fear, we really put our finger on the crux of today’s political problem. Government has grown to a size that makes everything it does tinged with the touch of violence, with the result that we just expect rogues to run that field.

    Send this post to a friend

    Sunday
    July 20, 2014
    A Random Passage "In the hall outside the Rothschild offices in nineteenth-century Paris, it was claimed that a man took off his hat when the Baron de Rothschild's chamber pot went past. Prestige can have that kind of effect on people." Joseph Epstein, Snobbery.

    Send this post to a friend

    Saturday
    July 19, 2014
    Menace of the HerdBody and Soul "Bodies are mutually attracted by nearness, knowledge, and pleasure but souls by distance, mystery, and suffering." Such thinking could trend into Cartesian dualism, which undermines the sacramental nature of existence, but it's always important to reassert that the soul and body are not the same. They're friends. They're even allies . . . in the war against the flesh and the devil. But the body is the weaker ally, so it's important to nourish the soul so it can do its job of strengthening the person. It's interesting to think about what KL's words imply about modern forms of "worship," which emphasize nearness ("come together and hold hands"), knowledge ("make sure everything is 100% accessible to the average guy in the pew"), and pleasure ("we must entertain the congregation and make it more fun").

    Send this post to a friend

    Meyers
    July 18, 2014
    Even though both Israel and Hamas fired on one another during the five-hour humanitarian period yesterday, the U.N. secretary general said both sides "mostly respected" the cease-fire. That's like leaving the house without pants and saying you're "mostly dressed."

    Send this post to a friend

    Friday
    Here's an article about the surging hard cider market. Excerpt:
    "Cider is made just like wine, but you drink it by the pint," said Richard Read of Griffin Cider Works, based in Westlake. "You perceive it like a wine; you drink it like a beer. Cider is the other white meat of the drinking world." The British-born Read – who operates out of the basement of J.W. Dover Beer and Wine Making Supplies on Detroit Avenue – keeps a passionate optimism about what he sees as cider's resurgence in the market. "Cider is new for a lot of people," he said. "We're getting there. Our sales continue to grow."
    I tried an Angry Orchard cider last summer, and I dang near gagged. I vowed never to drink another hard cider, but I bumped into a gluten-intolerant drinking friend at the liquor store last weekend, and he was buying a six-pack of it. I said, "Do you like that stuff?" He said it's delicious and gave it a ringing endorsement. I told him about my experience, and he said he can practically guarantee me that I just got a bad one. I'm gonna give it another try. I'll let y'all know what I think.

    Send this post to a friend

    Received in an Email
    July 17, 2014
    After Nigeria was eliminated from the world cup, the Nigerian captain personally offered to refund all the expenses of fans that traveled to Brazil. He said he just needs their bank details and pin numbers to complete the transaction.

    Send this post to a friend

    Thursday
    Bullets I'm using today's main post to clear out some links I've been meaning to blog about. Most come from Listverse: Pope Joan is Number 3: "10 People Who Achieved Great Things (Despite Never Existing)." I dig Pope Francis, even if his economics is a bit troubling. Thomas Woods' take-down of a left-wing Cardinal in this area is worth reading. I'm not a huge Rat Pack guy, but that whole scene intrigues me, so I enjoyed seeing this: 10 Strange Stories About Frank Sinatra. Tired of "higher" education in America today? Here's a corrective: Top 10 Books for a Classical Education.

    Send this post to a friend

    Meyers
    July 16, 2014
    Brazil's coach resigned following the country's historic 7-1 loss in the World Cup last week. He says he wants to spend more time focusing on not being murdered.

    Send this post to a friend

    Wednesday
    Background: When I was the editor of Gilbert Magazine, I was responsible for the "Tremendous Trifles" column. It was occasionally hard to find a sufficient amount of interesting GKC material to fill the page, so John Peterson sent me a file full of Chesterton ancedotes. They were idiosyncratic, historical, and Chestertonian. He gave me permission to use them here. I hope y'all find them as interesting as I have over the years. Most of them have never been published. Chesterton Short(s) In Frederick Wilhelmson's Hilaire Belloc: No Alienated Man there is a judicious comparison of Chesterton and Belloc that bears reprinting:
    Belloc's attack seems to have been less effective than Chesterton's, because Chesterton brought to the battle an amazing good humour and charity for the enemy. Belloc could rarely accept the good will of men who opposed his judgments. They were either fools or liars. [Chapter 2, Sheed and Ward, 1954].
    And savor this: "Today Belloc remains a writer who has not been tried and found wanting, but who has simply not been tried at all."

    Send this post to a friend

    Interesting
    July 15, 2014
    H.I.F. Not just interesting, but stunning. I can't believe these stats saw the light of the mainstream media's day:
    This year's National Health Interview Survey was the first to ask about sexual orientation in addition to health habits in its 57-year history, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Bisexual women were twice as likely to experience serious anxiety while bisexual men were more likely to indulge in binge drinking than others, according to the survey. In the survey of more than 34,500 Americans age 18 and above, 1.6 percent reported that they were gay and 0.7 percent reported that they were bisexual. A total of 96.6 percent reported being straight and 1.1 percent either said they were "something else," did not know or declined to answer. Roughly twice as many women than men identified as bisexual, with 0.9 percent of female respondents saying they were attracted to both sexes. Bisexual women were twice as likely to report having serious anxiety than any other group, with almost 11 percent saying they had been distressed in the past month. Among bisexual men, almost 52 percent said they had five drinks or more in a night during the past year compared with only 31 percent of straight men.
    Alfred Kinsey's 10% figure has been discredited for decades now, but I still run into people who think it's the case. Maybe stuff like this will get the reality to sink in.

    Send this post to a friend

    Tuesday
    Many years ago, I read that T.S. Eliot wouldn't read Flannery O'Connor's fiction because he found the violence too unsettling. The idea of avoiding a mode of entertaining for such a reason had never occurred to me (in my arrogance, I probably figured nothing could affect me), but I figured that if a man of Eliot's caliber would eschew a writer as tame (by today's standards) as O'Connor, I should at least consider it. I started looking at my state of mind following horror flicks and intensely violent films ("Natural Born Killers" was the movie I remember using as a test), and decided Eliot was right. Since then, I've done a decent job of avoiding things that revolve around pain and horror, but this list at Listverse yesterday drew me in. 10 Crazy Facts About Charles Manson. It's fascinating, and after you get past the first paragraph, it's not too-terribly graphic. Excerpt:
    Charlie didn’t even much care for the Beatles. He was older than most of his followers and stated in several interviews that he, like other members of his generation, preferred Bing Crosby, Perry Como, and cowboy balladeers like Frankie Laine.

    Send this post to a friend

    Enter Amazon here, buy something, and get me a kickback.


    For more than fifty years, the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) has been helping conservative students achieve a genuine liberal arts education. Offering study guides, graduate fellowships, conservative books and speakers, online audio lectures, and a host of other programs and publications.

    Catholic Men's Quarterly, a one-of-a-kind general interest men's magazine written by Catholic men for Catholic men. Makes a great Father's Day gift.


    "The Daily Eudemon is the sort of thing that Chesterton or Mencken would be doing, if they were alive today. It's what, in saner times, was called journalism. In the writing and in the reading, it's exactly the sort of leisure we should want at the basis of culture."
    Mike Aquilina, Author of The Fathers of the Church and TV Talk Show Host.

    "Literate Catholicism-urbane, witty, engaged-is alive and well! If you can read, you should be reading The Daily Eudemon!" David Scott, author of A Revolution of Love: The Meaning of Mother Teresa

    "If you like your blogs pithy, nimble, pointed, high-spirited, and waggish, then bookmmark Eric Scheske's The Daily Eudemon. Ooops! You want prolixity, density, meandering, dull, and sober? Then run (do not walk!) to the blogs of the major news outlets. They have just what you want. Honestly they do." John Peterson, Editor, G.K. Chesterton: Collected Works, Volumes 12 and 13.

    "Eric Scheske's web site is full of information and insight.  Always worth a read."  James V. Schall, Author of Another Sort of Learning.

    "Eric Scheske has one of the few indispensable sites in an overcrowded blogosphere." Thomas E. Woods, Jr., Ph.D., New York Times Bestselling Author and Author of How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization.

    links
    Abbey-Roads
    Acts of the Apostasy
    After Abortion
    Aggie Catholics
    All Manner of Things
    Belinda’s Brain
    Bethune Catholic
    Betty Duffy
    Book Reviews and More
    Catholic Blogs
    Catholic Exchange
    Catholic Fire
    Charlotte Was Both
    Chesterton and Friends
    Crossroads
    Decent Films
    Digital Hairshirt
    Dyspeptic Mutterings
    Eric Scheske Writer’s Site
    EWTN
    Fathers of the Church
    First Principles
    Get Blogs
    Gilbert Magazine
    Godspy
    Happy Catholic
    Mark Shea
    Mere Comments
    Michelle Reitemeyer
    More Last Than Star
    National Catholic Register
    New Advent
    Phat Catholic
    Pillar and Fire
    Post Modern Papist
    PowerBlog
    Pro Ecclesia
    Quaffs and Quibbles
    Reasoned Audacity
    Reconnaissance of the Western Tradition
    Roman Catholic Info
    Ruri et Orbi
    Scheske at Catholic Exchange
    Scholium
    Shadow of Diogenes
    Signs of the Times: Salvo Blog
    Some Have Hats
    St. Blog’s Parish Blog Digger
    St. Blog’s Parish Directory
    St. James Journal
    St. Peter Canisius Apostolate
    Standing on My Head
    Stella Maris
    Stony Creek Digest
    Streams of Mercy
    Stupid Scholar
    Suicide of the West
    Summa Minutiae
    Taki
    The American Conservative
    The Blue Boar
    The Cafeteria is Closed
    The Crescat
    The Curt Jester
    The Dawn Patrol
    The Drunken Dollar
    The Impractical Christian
    The Inn at the End of the World
    The Michiana Blawg
    The Muniment Room
    The Radical Academy
    The Reticulator
    The Saint Wannabe
    The Scratching Post
    The Snoring Scholar
    The Summa Mamas
    The Waffling Anglican
    The Western Confucian
    Things and Stuff
    Thursday Night Gumbo
    Uncovering Orthodoxy
    Victor Lams
    Video Meliora
    Vita Mea
    Vox Nova
    What's Wrong with the World
    With Both Hands
    Within the Garden
    Without Having Seen
    World Wide Words

    the bloghorn
    Abbey-Roads
    Acts of the Apostasy
    After Abortion
    Aggie Catholics
    All Manner of Things
    Belinda’s Brain
    Bethune Catholic
    Betty Duffy
    Book Reviews and More
    Catholic Blogs
    Catholic Exchange
    Catholic Fire
    Charlotte Was Both
    Chesterton and Friends
    Crossroads
    Decent Films
    Digital Hairshirt
    Dyspeptic Mutterings
    Eric Scheske Writer’s Site
    EWTN
    Fathers of the Church
    First Principles
    Get Blogs
    Gilbert Magazine
    Godspy
    Happy Catholic
    Mark Shea
    Mere Comments
    Michelle Reitemeyer
    More Last Than Star
    National Catholic Register
    New Advent
    Phat Catholic
    Pillar and Fire
    Post Modern Papist
    PowerBlog
    Pro Ecclesia
    Quaffs and Quibbles
    Reasoned Audacity
    Reconnaissance of the Western Tradition
    Roman Catholic Info
    Ruri et Orbi
    Scheske at Catholic Exchange
    Scholium
    Shadow of Diogenes
    Signs of the Times: Salvo Blog
    Some Have Hats
    St. Blog’s Parish Blog Digger
    St. Blog’s Parish Directory
    St. James Journal
    St. Peter Canisius Apostolate
    Standing on My Head
    Stella Maris
    Stony Creek Digest
    Streams of Mercy
    Stupid Scholar
    Suicide of the West
    Summa Minutiae
    Taki
    The American Conservative
    The Blue Boar
    The Cafeteria is Closed
    The Crescat
    The Curt Jester
    The Dawn Patrol
    The Drunken Dollar
    The Impractical Christian
    The Inn at the End of the World
    The Michiana Blawg
    The Muniment Room
    The Radical Academy
    The Reticulator
    The Saint Wannabe
    The Scratching Post
    The Snoring Scholar
    The Summa Mamas
    The Waffling Anglican
    The Western Confucian
    Things and Stuff
    Thursday Night Gumbo
    Uncovering Orthodoxy
    Victor Lams
    Video Meliora
    Vita Mea
    Vox Nova
    What's Wrong with the World
    With Both Hands
    Within the Garden
    Without Having Seen
    World Wide Words

    << # St. Blog's Parish ? >> 


    The Daily Eudemon is Copyright 2005 Eric Scheske.

    Design by Aquilina Computer Services.